2/20/2009

Some support for concealed carry in Illinois

The House Agriculture (a strange choice) passed out a concealed carry bill.

A panel dominated by downstate lawmakers has again recommended the General Assembly give Illinois residents the right to carry concealed weapons.

For at least the fourth time in recent years, the House agriculture committee’s endorsement of the controversial idea likely will run headlong this spring into serious opposition from Chicago-area lawmakers who oppose the concept.

“There are obviously big philosophical issues over this,” said state Rep. John Bradley, a Marion Democrat who is pushing one of the two concealed carry proposals approved by the committee Wednesday.

Illinois and Wisconsin are the only states that do not offer residents the opportunity to carry concealed weapons if they undergo training.

The issue has never gained traction in the Legislature because of concerns by Chicago-area lawmakers about increased handgun violence.

Opponents say allowing more people to have weapons could lead to more shootings in the state’s largest city.

“When you increase access, you increase risk,” said Chris Boyster, spokesman for the Illinois Council Against Handgun Violence. “You’re going to provide a false sense of security.”
. . .


And the evidence for this last point is what? Permit holders are extremely law-abiding. They lose their permits for any gun related violation at hundredths or thousandths of one percent.

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7 Comments:

OpenID DougHuffman said...

Kurt Erickson wrote, "Illinois and Wisconsin are the only states that do not offer residents the opportunity to carry concealed weapons if they undergo training."

That is, for Wisconsin, incorrect and disinformative. Concealed weapons are illegal in Wisconsin and concealed weapons may be carried without training in other jurisdictions.

Doug Huffman
Washington Island
Wisconsin

2/21/2009 7:44 AM  
OpenID DougHuffman said...

Perhaps Boyster would have the sense of security be false.

I read Erickson's article after reading Michael Moyer's 'Stick 'Em Up: Do economic recessions really lead to spikes in crime?' in the current, March 2009, Scientific American.

There, the "economic stimulus" becomes a 'salve' and helpful vaccine and policing is the the brief sting that is good for you.

2/21/2009 7:58 AM  
Blogger David said...

Doug Huffman-Your comment makes no sense, that is what John said, you can't carry in Wisconsin-trained or not.

2/21/2009 1:25 PM  
Blogger David said...

I like how the Chicago politicians work, to heck with everyone else, we are only worried about us.

Most of the big city people, not all mind you, are brainwashed that guns are terrible things. If the guns are so terrible why don't they follow Britain's lead and give their police batons instead of guns?

After all, “When you increase access, you increase risk,” says Chris Boyster, spokesman for the Illinois Council Against Handgun Violence. Seems the police would have less risk if the would reduce their access to firearms.

2/21/2009 1:31 PM  
Blogger 1 said...

"I read Erickson's article after reading Michael Moyer's 'Stick 'Em Up: Do economic recessions really lead to spikes in crime?' in the current, March 2009, Scientific American"...

Gee! Isn't Scientific American pushing the man made global warming crapola?

This makes me leary of anything S.A. might have to say since they are either complicit in the global warming scam or are not smart enough to know when a dog & pony show is just that, a dog and a pony doing tricks...

What I did find interesting was the following from the National Criminal Justice Referesnce Service was the following regarding the experience of the French: This statistical study analyzes prison statistics, unemployment figures, statistics of recorded crime, and demographic variables during two economic recessions (1920-1938 and 1982-1985). The direct link between high unemployment and rising crime that is so commonly assumed was not found in either recession. Instead the results showed a direct influence of the labor market on the size of the prison population. Rising unemployment figures correlated with a growth in the number of inmates, although the number of recorded offenses did not rise correspondingly. To explain this phenomenon, the study argues that economic hardship increases the traditional target population of the criminal justice system: a marginal, economically insecure group of people who are the first to lose their jobs. At the same time, the criminal justice system tends to become less tolerant during recessions and chooses preventive detention and prison sentences over alternatives to prisonization...

2/21/2009 2:40 PM  
Blogger Chas said...

The issue has never gained traction in the Legislature because of fraudulent concerns by Chicago-area lawmakers about increased handgun violence. What makes the Chicago-area different?

2/21/2009 3:50 PM  
OpenID DougHuffman said...

Dave, I waited these hours for a concise explanation of the error to come to me. The 'if' conditional is extraneous and disinformative. There is no 'if' in the Wisconsin law.

Doug

2/22/2009 7:17 PM  

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